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kanyewestboro:

for the next piece in my ‘Youth Culture and Revolt’ series, I’m working on a poster for a war movie (in this case, the Vietnam War). The genre of films pertaining to the Vietnam war is rich, diverse, and influential, and the subject portrayed in those films is as complex, morally frustrating, and heart wrenching as you can get. Inspired partially by ‘The Things They Carried,’ my Vietnam War movie, ‘Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong,’ follows a young soldier’s struggle with morality, sanity, the absurdity of the war itself, and the trauma of having to complete adolescence as a soldier rather than as a man. 

The quote, “Baby Killer,” on the helmet is from the young adult novel, ‘Cracker! The Best Dog in Vietnam.’ As the main character finally returns from war, emotionally and physically broken, he is met with protesters who verbally assault him. When I read this part of the book, I was enraged that this supposed pacifist lacked the empathy to be kind to someone who may well have been forced to witness the deaths of innocent children. While I certainly do not believe that the war itself was justified, I do believe that the brutalities that those who fought it endured were extremely real and they very deserving of compassion—especially because many of the soldiers in Vietnam had been drafted, and they were not truly responsible for the war.

kanyewestboro:

for the next piece in my ‘Youth Culture and Revolt’ series, I’m working on a poster for a war movie (in this case, the Vietnam War). The genre of films pertaining to the Vietnam war is rich, diverse, and influential, and the subject portrayed in those films is as complex, morally frustrating, and heart wrenching as you can get. Inspired partially by ‘The Things They Carried,’ my Vietnam War movie, ‘Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong,’ follows a young soldier’s struggle with morality, sanity, the absurdity of the war itself, and the trauma of having to complete adolescence as a soldier rather than as a man.

The quote, “Baby Killer,” on the helmet is from the young adult novel, ‘Cracker! The Best Dog in Vietnam.’ As the main character finally returns from war, emotionally and physically broken, he is met with protesters who verbally assault him. When I read this part of the book, I was enraged that this supposed pacifist lacked the empathy to be kind to someone who may well have been forced to witness the deaths of innocent children. While I certainly do not believe that the war itself was justified, I do believe that the brutalities that those who fought it endured were extremely real and they very deserving of compassion—especially because many of the soldiers in Vietnam had been drafted, and they were not truly responsible for the war.




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kanyewestboro:

SO MUCH DAMN DETAIL MY HAND IS ALL CRAMPY UGH

kanyewestboro:

SO MUCH DAMN DETAIL MY HAND IS ALL CRAMPY UGH




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When did I draw this

When did I draw this




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kanyewestboro:

Film poster for a series I’m doing in AP Art, on “Youth Culture and Revolt” throughout the past 60 years. Lost in Space criticizes how the generation that grew up on the space race (and benefited from a much more stable economy) views “Generation Y,” a generation that has barely had time to make its mark on the world.

kanyewestboro:

Film poster for a series I’m doing in AP Art, on “Youth Culture and Revolt” throughout the past 60 years. Lost in Space criticizes how the generation that grew up on the space race (and benefited from a much more stable economy) views “Generation Y,” a generation that has barely had time to make its mark on the world.




self portrait using pre-raphaelite and fauvist themes plus religious iconic imagery

self portrait using pre-raphaelite and fauvist themes plus religious iconic imagery




quick sketch of lucy liu

quick sketch of lucy liu




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markers n stuff.

markers n stuff.




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kanyewestboro:

the hollow men